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aircraft:tmd [2019/07/21 15:21]
jh
aircraft:tmd [2019/07/21 15:22] (current)
jh
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   *Abbreviations are avoided, the full name is always preferred.  ​   *Abbreviations are avoided, the full name is always preferred.  ​
  
-===== Object ​structure ​=====+===== Object ​Structure ​=====
  
 The example code below creates an object of the class '​control_input'​ with the name '​ThrottleLever'​ in the dynamics section when the simulator loads the aircraft. During runtime, this object will filter out messages with the name '​Controls.Throttle1'​ which are typically sent by the control device assigned to the left throttle input in the '​Controls Settings'​ user interface. The control_input object will store the value of the latest message in memory for later use by other objects. The example code below creates an object of the class '​control_input'​ with the name '​ThrottleLever'​ in the dynamics section when the simulator loads the aircraft. During runtime, this object will filter out messages with the name '​Controls.Throttle1'​ which are typically sent by the control device assigned to the left throttle input in the '​Controls Settings'​ user interface. The control_input object will store the value of the latest message in memory for later use by other objects.
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 </​code>​ </​code>​
  
-===== Object ​Communication Within a Section =====+===== Communication Within a Section =====
  
 Most objects in the tmd file need to communicate in some form. For example, a jet_engine object needs to know the throttle lever position so that it can calculate the thrust increase or decrease over time and apply a variable strength force to the '​Fuselage'​ to accelerate it. In the tmd code snipped below, the developer defined that the engine should use the output of the ThrottleLever object as its ThrottleControl input. It would also be possible to use the autothrottle output as an example or any other imaginable output from an instrument reading or an output of a logic circuit if that is desired. Most objects in the tmd file need to communicate in some form. For example, a jet_engine object needs to know the throttle lever position so that it can calculate the thrust increase or decrease over time and apply a variable strength force to the '​Fuselage'​ to accelerate it. In the tmd code snipped below, the developer defined that the engine should use the output of the ThrottleLever object as its ThrottleControl input. It would also be possible to use the autothrottle output as an example or any other imaginable output from an instrument reading or an output of a logic circuit if that is desired.
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 These manually programmed connections allow enormous flexibility,​ easy debugging and incredibly simple and fast object code. Each object can be as '​stupid'​ as can be, it just uses its inputs, does something with it and sets its output value or internal state if it has one. Then, if another object comes by and wants to know the output value, it just grabs it and calculates its outputs with that. This way very long chains, logic trees or even iterations and control loops can be created that actually perform different logic depending on the aircraft'​s state or the user's inputs. It's important to note that the order in which the objects appear in the tmd code has no effect on the simulation. These manually programmed connections allow enormous flexibility,​ easy debugging and incredibly simple and fast object code. Each object can be as '​stupid'​ as can be, it just uses its inputs, does something with it and sets its output value or internal state if it has one. Then, if another object comes by and wants to know the output value, it just grabs it and calculates its outputs with that. This way very long chains, logic trees or even iterations and control loops can be created that actually perform different logic depending on the aircraft'​s state or the user's inputs. It's important to note that the order in which the objects appear in the tmd code has no effect on the simulation.
  
-===== Object ​Communication Across Sections =====+===== Communication Across Sections =====
  
 Objects defined in different sections of the tmd cannot communicate directly. The only possible connections are from the dynamics section to the graphics section and from the dynamics section to the sound section. Objects defined in different sections of the tmd cannot communicate directly. The only possible connections are from the dynamics section to the graphics section and from the dynamics section to the sound section.
aircraft/tmd.1563715291.txt.gz · Last modified: 2019/07/21 15:21 by jh