• Hello All.


    I have just watched a truly beautiful video of a sailplane in Aerofly FS2 shown in 4K.

    Everything in the scenery was sharp and as close to real as I have seen.


    What is 4K? I am thinking maybe it is a VDU which has far more pixels to make the

    scenery look so sharp.


    Would someone like to explain for me please.


    Regards,

    Jim.

    Computer: PB Gaming 62000 Skylake Core i5 6600, Quad Core 3.3Ghz with Premium Cooling, 16GB DDR4 Gaming Ram, 250GB SSD, 2TB HHD, N'VIDEA GTX 1070 8GB GDDR5, DIRECTX12 Gaming Graphic's Card, VR Ready, Windows10 Home Edition, 64bit, 2 x 24" Widescreen HDMI 1080p VDU's

    - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

    Amateur Radio Station: ZL2BMH

  • Thanks Jan. By crikey it's beautiful to view.


    Jim.

    Computer: PB Gaming 62000 Skylake Core i5 6600, Quad Core 3.3Ghz with Premium Cooling, 16GB DDR4 Gaming Ram, 250GB SSD, 2TB HHD, N'VIDEA GTX 1070 8GB GDDR5, DIRECTX12 Gaming Graphic's Card, VR Ready, Windows10 Home Edition, 64bit, 2 x 24" Widescreen HDMI 1080p VDU's

    - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

    Amateur Radio Station: ZL2BMH

  • Thanks for clarifying. 3480 X 2160 = 8,294K pixels, which never quite made sense to me as "4K". So it really should be called 4X?


    A Samsung Odyssey WMR headset has 1440x1600 per eye (2880x1600 overall -- 4,608K pixels) so I guess that would be something like 2.2K, or 2.2X? :o)

  • A Samsung Odyssey WMR headset has 1440x1600 per eye (2880x1600 overall -- 4,608K pixels) so I guess that would be something like 2.2K, or 2.2X? :o)

    Theoratically you could say that but when in use it certainly doesn’t look like that. It kinda looks more like a 640x480 screen. ;) Due to how VR works (looking at a small screen being enlarged at a very close distance) the quality is nowhere NEAR a regular 2D screen. Not even close. The so called screen door effect is caused by the space between the pixels: yes, you are actually seeing EACH pixel separately and the space between them! It is like watching at your regular HD screen from one centimeter distance. No wonder it doesn’t look too good.

  • Also, don't forget that the pixels per eye in VR mode (for example, "the Samsung Odyssey WMR headset has 1440x1600 per eye " ) are being spread over approximately 100 degrees Field of View (FOV) instead of the usual 50 or 60 degrees for one HD (1920x1080)monitor. This much larger FOV is what keeps you from feeling like you are watching a TV from a distance with surrounding black.

  • Also, don't forget that the pixels per eye in VR mode (for example, "the Samsung Odyssey WMR headset has 1440x1600 per eye " ) are being spread over approximately 100 degrees Field of View (FOV) instead of the usual 50 or 60 degrees for one HD (1920x1080)monitor. This much larger FOV is what keeps you from feeling like you are watching a TV from a distance with surrounding black.

    I think this is why most folks seem so disappointed when they first see the images in VR. I think they are expecting the view and resolution to be closer to what they see on their monitor.


    Regards,

    Ray