Aerofly FS 2 Robinson R22 Helicopter Released!

  • I've just lost 40min of my life flying around Manhattan. Absolutely wonderful. You can land on any surface big enough to take the aircraft, so I've been hopping from roof to roof for ages, settling and enjoying the view. A slow take-off and slipping over the side of a skyscraper in VR is a truly wonderful thing.

    +1 for the yaw string too, it's a great detail.

    i7-7700K/Gigabyte RTX2080/Win10 64bit/32Gb RAM/Asus Xonar DX+ Beyer DT990 pro headphones/LG 34" UM65 @2560x1080/Rift CV1/TM Warthog+VKB MkIV Rudder pedals

  • Great fun and thanks for not making it too easy.

    My 'tuppence worth'.


    Don't zoom in too tight, you need to see the changing outside orientation. Keep looking outside more than with a plane.

    Use the HUD. It allows low speed pitch and roll adjustments to be kept inside 2 or 3 degrees. This makes 'profi' mode quite manageable. The flight path vector symbol also mirrors the string instrument.

    Use rudder trim, I'm using a twist rudder at the minute and trimming out the force needed is much more pleasant.

    Don't use any excess throttle/collective, reduce it as forward speed builds up.

    Like learning to ride a bike, there will come a 'I've got it' moment. Keep practicing.


    I regret not having to pay for this excellent new aircraft. I'd like to invest in more sophisticated planes, just a bit tired of add-on scenery purchases.

  • First, thanks!!!!!!!!!!


    If I may, a constructive comment, it's a bit to easy on the easy mode and a bit (the cyclic) to sensitive on the PROFI mode.


    But in general it's a superb addon to explore slowly so my places.


    I only have 10 hours of real flying on an old 47 but like I said it didn't feel that sensitive.


    Regards, Ben

    BennyBoy. I5 8600K @ 4,3ghz, 16 ram, GTX 1060 6G @ UW @2560 X 1080. Sim: AF2 & P3D V4

  • R22 is really nice. Outstanding work! Thanks!

    But I'm having an issue since the update. The wind turbines in ORBX Netherlands Addon are 'disassembled'. The pylons float above the ground and the fans rotate a few meters above the turbine housing. Anyone else seeing this?

  • I have noticed a bug when viewing a recorded segment of the R22. The main rotor on play back is turning in slow motion.

    Other than that I have not seen any problems. I just completed a flight from Trenton NJ to the FedEx terminal at Newark airport and it was a blast to fly the R22 and to land. Getting better at landing.

    Great work to the IPACS team.

  • In the real aircraft you have a much greater movement on the stick, it's probably at least 4 times longer

  • I have noticed a bug when viewing a recorded segment of the R22. The main rotor on play back is turning in slow motion.

    Other than that I have not seen any problems. I just completed a flight from Trenton NJ to the FedEx terminal at Newark airport and it was a blast to fly the R22 and to land. Getting better at landing.

    Great work to the IPACS team.

    I think that is like a shutter speed effect. The recording only samples the state every so often, which means couple or rotations get lost each time. We might be able to fix it, I'll ask

  • I NEED A SMALL HELP:


    The first, CONGRATULATIONS, IPACS; Once again, you have built another "flying work of art".


    I had never flown a helicopter, and ... after the first contact with this, the impression is very good. In principle, it is not difficult to fly it, but I have this problem, and I ask help from the helicopter flying experts to configure my controls.


    I have a simple Joystick system (THRUSMASTER USB Joystick, Joystick, PC, With USB cable connection.)


    I have assigned the 'collective' function to the throttle lever (on the joystick). With this, I get up or down by varying the angle of attack of the blades), but I need another device (in my case it will have to be a keyboard key), to accelerate (give more power to the engine). This device would have to provide 'progressive power' (progressive acceleration / deceleration of the motor.


    I've tried with several keys and it does not work. The keys do not provide me with a progressive function. How to solve it ?.


    Once again, I'm waiting for your help


    Thank you very much, and kind regards. Delfín

  • You shouldn't need to touch the throttle I think, as once you take it up to about 75% the governor takes over and feeds power when needed. It doesn't need manually adjusting during flight.

    i7-7700K/Gigabyte RTX2080/Win10 64bit/32Gb RAM/Asus Xonar DX+ Beyer DT990 pro headphones/LG 34" UM65 @2560x1080/Rift CV1/TM Warthog+VKB MkIV Rudder pedals

  • Great Helicopter, so far the best I ever flown in a flightsimulater, but I've noticed that I need now some serious, good quality, controllers to fly in profi mode. I struggle the most with my rudder pedals, they are to less sensitive around the center, I always overpitch the tailrotor, almost unable to fly in profi mode.


    kind of interrested how you manage this?


    me in profi mode<X

  • In the real aircraft you have a much greater movement on the stick, it's probably at least 4 times longer


    Even when I set the sensibility of the cyclic axis of my X52 Pro HOTAS to the lowest possible value in the controller configuration settings, the cyclic in the virtual cockpit of the R22 moves much stronger than my physical joystick in the real world. It's like it "amplifies" my physical joystick movements. Wouldn't it be nice if we could use the sensitivity settings of the input device to compensate for different types of controllers, like short (normal) joysticks, and profi equipment like the "Puma" with cyclic controllers of much larger size ?


    I'm really experienced in Helicopter Simming on several platforms, but currently I'm struggling with the sensitivity of the R22 controls in Profi mode.


    Apart from that: Really a great Helicopter Sim. Thank you!

  • You shouldn't need to touch the throttle I think, as once you take it up to about 75% the governor takes over and feeds power when needed. It doesn't need manually adjusting during flight.


    Let's see John


    Initially the helicopter is on the ground, it is supposed to idle. Next we have to accelerate (increase the r.p.m. = Throttle); once the rpm is increased, we gently activate the collective, and consequently ascend. Once we reach the desired altitude (with rpm at approximately 75% of its power (or any other), we would continue to move horizontally.When we want to descend, we must necessarily decrease the angle of attack of the blade, consequently, it will increase its rpm (consequence of the decrease in lift), and here again, we have to decrease the throttle, otherwise, the blades would increase in excess their rpm


    If my reasoning is wrong, I beg you to explain it to me, but I have a hard time believing, that it is not necessary to act on the power applied to the helicopter engine and that we solve everything with the collective, once certain rpm of the blades has been reached.


    Regards: Delfin

  • The governor adjusts the throttle to maintain the rotor rpm. Throttle adjustment is quite minor, if you want to you could assign a pair of key switches to throttle. I have a throttle axis and I don't really need it, it can put out the low rpm light on the ground.

  • You don't have to manage the rotation speed or the rotor, that is taken care of by the governor, default on, default enabled, default not assigned since you don't need to do any changes to it.

    You don't need to adjust the throttle at all. I have don't even have it assigned and it works perfectly. Just increase collective and the power will be increased automatically, by the governor. Just ignore all the engine management and raise the collective, that will lift you up.... If you want to descent just move the collective down again. No need to adjust any rotation speed!

  • A governor, piston or turbine, is set for a given engine RPM.


    It's basically a bob weight. As the engine speed increases the weights fly outwards due to centrifugal force, this cause the slider that the weights are attached to, to move upwards, this then slightly restricts the fuel flow to the engine, the engine then slows down slightly. If the engine underspeeds the bob weights move downwards, less centrifugal force and this results in an increase in fuel to the engine. Of course this is happening all the time as load is applied via the pilot or aerodynamic forces on the blades etc.


    Some piston helicopters require you to increase or decrease the throttle manually as you increase or decrease collective pitch, rolling on or off the throttle as its called. Enstrom come to mind as do Bell47


    Steve

    To add just a bit more


    Some gas turbine helicopters allow you to manually increase the throttle via the governor, bleeping the throttle we used to call this. Its's normally only for a minor increase/decrease to assist with some power management, Westland Scout and I believe the Bell UH1 and Jet ranger. It's mainly older gas turbines as they had a habit of compressor surging