The Good Old Days

  • I recently obtained an operating copy of Flight Simulator II for the Commodore 64. This was my main flight sim for about three years from 1984 to 1987 when I finally got a PC clone.


    1 frame per second. Mesh graphics. All of the ground is green, all of the sky and water is blue. Almost no buildings, and what buildings there are are simple see-through mesh or just "sticks" in the ground. Even the runways are green (I had forgotten that). There are a few major highways, represented by a white line. There are a total of 80 airports in four areas, NY, LA, Seattle and of course Chicago. Long live the Meigs Field starting location! Oh, and it takes 2:40 to load from disk.


    I loved this sim, and must have logged 3000 hours on it. But playing it again reminds me of just how far the sim world has come, and how lucky we are. We would never have believed it was possible to ever have the sims we have now back then. We live in sim nirvana. I will keep repeating that to myself. ;)

  • I recently obtained an operating copy of Flight Simulator II for the Commodore 64. This was my main flight sim for about three years from 1984 to 1987 when I finally got a PC clone.

    Flight Simulator II for the Commodore 64 was also my first experience with a flight simulator game. Then it was necessary to have a lot of dreamy imagination. I still have both the computer and the software on the shelf. 8)

  • I remember flying Flight Simulator ll on my Commodore 64 too, I was so excited back then. I never expected to see anything like Aerofly FS2 in my lifetime. Thank you IPACS, and Bruce Artwick.

    Windows 7 (64-Bit), Asus Sabertooth (Intel Z87) SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0, Intel 4th Gen Core i7 4770K (4.5GHz Overclock) Quad Core, Cooling Antec 920 Dual Stage CPU Liquid Cooling,16GB Dual Channel DDR3 SDRAM 1866MHz, 6GB Nvidia GeForce GTX Titan, GDDR5, PCIe, 950 Watt PC Power & Cooling MK II.

  • I guess I was a late bloomer. My first experience was FSX and I was never happy with the default roads, houses and autogen. I lived through every edition or version of MegaSceneryEarth and even the precursor that I have already forgot the name. Even though it got better every year it still sucks when compared to my FSET scenery in AFS2. The placement of houses, buildings and static aircraft using fsCloudPort coupled with the placement of trees using the new Cultivation Scenery Editor is lightyears ahead of what was available just 10 years ago.


    The default aircraft is also cleaner and sharper than the run of the mill Carenado payware even though the systems are far inferior. Still fun to fly.


    Regards,

    Ray

    When Pigs Fly. A steely-eyed Sierra Hotel record setting F-15E Strike Eagle simulator pilot. 8o

    ready for some voices in the sky? now available . . . Aerofly FS2 RC ATC https://afs2rcatc.com/


  • When autogen first appeared in the FS series around 1999 it felt miraculous. Who cared where the buildings and trees were placed, there finally WERE buildings and trees outside of tiny areas!


    Moving vehicles were super cool too. I think those showed up after autogen.

    Jetjockey10, have you ever seen F15E Strike Eagle by MicroProse for the Commodore 64? I spent hundreds of hours playing that. Looking at it today it is difficult to even figure out what is going on outside the cockpit, so bad are the graphics. It's like a stick figure slide show.

  • My first sim was actually MSFS1. My Dad had started a company and had one of the early PC (XT). He allowed my to fly some 20 min per day, but then I had to leave.

    I don't know the specs of this computer anymore, but the follwing one I still remember. FS3 and FS4 were running perfectly on it

    -Tandon 286

    -8 MHz

    -1 MB RAM

    -20 MB harddisc ("It will never get full")


    In FS4 I created the first sceneries. There was a great addon called "Aircraft and Scenery Designer". It was at that time so quick and easy to create sceneries, as there were no textures, etc. I was building all kind of little and cozy airfields out of fantasie. Great times, indeed. :)


    Kai

  • Oh boy! Great memories indeed. Flight Simulator II was the primary reason I saved up enough to buy my first computer, the Commodore 64. I was a young teen who didn't get an allowance. We had to earn every penny doing work for dad and from summer jobs. But I HAD to get a copy of flight simulator, since I couldn't afford real flight lessons. Got my copy and the rest was downhill, lol. Spent hours at Meigs learning about traffic patterns and doing touch & go's..haha. My world opened up and I eventually bought an Amiga 500, then PC clone and bought practically every flightsim/game that was produced!

    Sixteen years later, I was able to finally pursue my childhood dream and get my PPL.

    It all started with SubLogic Flight Simulator II and the C64 :).


    Correction: I started with Solo Flight, then Flight Simulator II, Flight Assignment ATP (i still have the charts and documentation), etc.

    I started with Solo Flight for the C64! Fond memories! It even had mail delivery missions!


    Aspen, Co... Wichita, Ks...Yeah baby! haha..those were the days^^

    Redtail

    KFRG, KTEB, KEWR, KLGA

    ~Straighten up and fly right~


    DESKTOP: i7-7700k @5GHz (water cooled), Nvidia GTX 1080Ti FTW3, 32GB DDR4, 500GB SSD, Oculus Rift CV1, Windows 10 Home 64 bit,

    TM HOTAS Warthog (large spring removed), Saitek PRO Flight Combat Rudder Pedals, YOKO yoke!

    Laptop (gaming): Acer Predator Helios 500- Intel Core i7-8750H @4.1GHz, Nvidia GTX 1070, 32GB DDR4, 256GB SSD/1TB HDD.

    Gametrix JetSeat FSE (Flight Sim Edition)-USB Vibrating pad. Nextlevel V3 Motion Platform / Sim cockpit.

    Edited 3 times, last by Redtail ().

  • Where there's a will, there's a way ...


    I became interested in flight sims in 1975 (age 13) when I wrote a BASIC program for a "Final Approach" simulator - no graphics, only numbers (sorta IFR).


    My dad had a dial-up thermal paper typewriter that connected to the SMU campus computer. The simulator would generate a random distance, altitude, and speed from the airport and print it on the next line of thermal paper. You would then reply with a throttle change number and pitch change number and the program would re-calculate and print your new distance, altitude, and speed.


    If you managed to touchdown on the runway under the max vertical speed, you would reply with brakes (B key) and the program would calculate and print out how much runway was left once you stopped (or you went off the runway!). Thanks to my dad for letting me use all that thermal paper!


    Still enjoy landing planes today!

  • Here is the Sears Tower in Chicago in all of its Flight Simulator II stunning beauty!


    I got Solo Flight after I got Flight Simulator II, and FS1 was one of the first programs I got for my PC clone when I finally got one.


    Flight Simulator II had some fairly neat features. Note the mixture, trim, and fuel flow, and they were all functional and operational. Pretty amazing stuff in 1984.

  • The "France 1917" mode was also available in Flight Simulator II. It was soooo hard to line up an enemy at 1 fps. My favorite method was to put myself into a tight turn and spray bullets. You are bound to hit something sooner or later!

  • Wow, what memories. My first 'Flight Simulator' was Sub Logics F19, way back in 1981 or perhaps 82. I really got into it with BAO FS2 or FS3, I don't recall exactly which, but it was fun to instantly recognize Chicago in Oldars screen capture. Can you imagine going back in time to your youth, and trying to convince yourself that you would be capable of having any thing even close to what we so often take for granted today? We have a lot to thank the developers for!

  • Just after year 2000 I had an asus graphics card with 3D shutter glasses, remote control and recoding TV! FS98 3D wasn’t that hot but MS MonsterTruck Madness had in your face 3D flying mud from the truck in front. I tried the super new FS2002 and got about 2 frames per second :-(

  • And the worst part is, we thought it was cool back then... :-)

    Worst part, or the best part? :)


    It really is crazy how wonderful it seemed at the time. I bought a copy of Kershner's Student Pilot Manual and "learned how to fly" with Flight Simulator II. After a while I could do almost everything he taught using that 1 fps simulator.


    And of course I was flying using the keyboard. I think the keyboard was much easier to use with the program than the joystick was.

  • Worst part, or the best part? :)


    It really is crazy how wonderful it seemed at the time. I bought a copy of Kershner's Student Pilot Manual and "learned how to fly" with Flight Simulator II. After a while I could do almost everything he taught using that 1 fps simulator.


    And of course I was flying using the keyboard. I think the keyboard was much easier to use with the program than the joystick was.

    Indeed!

    I bought this book and learned so much, never realizing that it would all pay off if I ever took real flight lessons, I was just having fun learning. When I finally did see a Cessna cockpit for the first time, everything was familiar.

    Great book!

    Learning to Fly With Flight Simulator, 1987

    -John Rafferty


    I still have it and a few others.

    Images

    Redtail

    KFRG, KTEB, KEWR, KLGA

    ~Straighten up and fly right~


    DESKTOP: i7-7700k @5GHz (water cooled), Nvidia GTX 1080Ti FTW3, 32GB DDR4, 500GB SSD, Oculus Rift CV1, Windows 10 Home 64 bit,

    TM HOTAS Warthog (large spring removed), Saitek PRO Flight Combat Rudder Pedals, YOKO yoke!

    Laptop (gaming): Acer Predator Helios 500- Intel Core i7-8750H @4.1GHz, Nvidia GTX 1070, 32GB DDR4, 256GB SSD/1TB HDD.

    Gametrix JetSeat FSE (Flight Sim Edition)-USB Vibrating pad. Nextlevel V3 Motion Platform / Sim cockpit.

    Edited 2 times, last by Redtail ().

  • And of course I was flying using the keyboard. I think the keyboard was much easier to use with the program than the joystick was.

    Yeah, I had forgotten that already. Fs1 and Fs2 I was flying with the keyboard as well.


    Actually, I had in more than 35 years of flight simulation only 3 joysticks. From FS 3 to FS5 a cheap one, then until FS2000 some Trustmaster (I think) and since FS2002 the Microsoft Sidewinder Force Feedback 2. This thing is just unbelievable. Since 18 years almost daily in action, has outlast at least 10 computers, survived 6 times moving (including abroad), several "flights" from the desk to the floor, flooding with mineral water and coffee, a crazy wife taking flight lessons and I don't know what more. ...and it still works perfectly.


    Kai