Pipercub released for public download

  • NOTE: I edited this announcement to make a few corrections and just kept adding additional paragraphs until now I get an error that the articles exceeds 10,000 characters and can't be updated. I deleted several paragraphs, but still get the message. My fix is to delete the first half, which is the history of the Cub Special and keep the second half that is more about the flight sim version. I will post the entire document over at the Flight-sim.org site in a few days. R.M.


    This is the freeware version that has been in work by krzysk and Jet-Pack for several months. The official model is PA-11 Cub Special and comes with the smooth engine cowling, 65 hp engine and can be flown solo from the front seat. Yes, it’s the yellow one.


    The PA-11 Piper Cub Special


    Our Cub Special was one of those in-between models that occupied a 2-year production period in 1947 and 1949. A total of 1,541 PA-11 models were built and many of them are still flying today.


    You will find an almost unlimited number of books and posts and magazine articles on the internet about Piper Cubs. Not all are accurate due to the overlap of production of many similar model. If you find one on the PA-12 for instance, it is probably close enough to our PA-11 use for flight sim flying.


    The Cub Special was the first Cub that could be soloed from the front seat. The fully enclosed engine makes it instantly recognizable to those folks that know Piper Cubs. A more slanted windshield and the 12 gallon fuel tank relocated from behind the engine to the root of the left wing, and a shift of the seats to the rear allows the C.G. to accommodate the front seat solo.


    Our model comes with the 65 hp specification in the tmd file, but for those that want a little more umph, this can upgraded to a 90 hp equivalent with a change to one line of code. Some of you may elect a more middle of the road choice and go for 75 hp. Just like Mr. Piper did, you can build this one to suit yourself.


    The Cub Special was probably the original STOL and is capable of some very short takeoffs and landings. Of course, the cruise speed is nothing to write home about, but if you are looking for speed, try the Extra 300.


    The gross weight is a whopping 1,220 pounds with an empty weight of 750 lbs. The next larger Cub is the more popular PA-18 Super Cub with most of them having 150 hp engines.


    The default paint scheme is the standard Cub Yellow, but also comes with six additional liveries plus a paintkit for those that enjoy specialized numbers or colors.


    I learned to fly in a Cessna 150, but got my Single Engine Sea rating in a 65 hp Cub on Edo floats. That may be the most fun I ever had with my clothes on.


    Speaking of floats. The way that Aerofly FS2 is configured for aircraft, it is simpler to have separate models for those Cubs equipped with floats and those equipped with skis. For those of us that keep wishing for backcountry tundra tires edition and the retractable wheel and skis combo version, our FS2 developer, krzysk, hasn’t ruled it out, these versions are just way down the todo list, near the bottom.


    Today, only the standard wheeled Cub Special is released to the public for instant download. The float and skis models are still being finalized and will be released once all the gremlins are found and all the final touches are completed. No date is set for these two models, but they are already flying in the beta form.

    .

    I have been on the beta testing team for the FS2 models since the beginning and I find it interesting that the simple little Piper Cub has received more attention than any of the other 50 or so models that are flying and being worked on. Today, this Cub Special received the 22nd extensive visit by the developer.


    There are many reasons for this, but, mostly it is because we want this Cub to be Special and live up to its name. This is one of the few models that the pilot can hand start and shut down to a dead stop.


    All the flight gauges work, which may be a first for Aerofly FS2. The magnetos and fuel selector are functional, the windows and right door is animated. This model did not come with an electrical system so it is daylight VFR only. The fuel gauge and oil pressure and temperature gauges work and the sound is really nice, it sounds just like a Cub. If you can't find the Parking Brake handle it is because the Cub never had one. This is truly a basic flying machine with a few creature comforts.


    The flight dynamics received a double whammy treatment by Jet-Pack Jan and krzysk and should be spot on. If not, we know where to find them. You can still ground loop the Cub, just like the real one. Stalls are pretty much a non-event. Kinda like mushing to the ground, right side up. Keep the airspeed above 40 and the wings near level and you won’t have a problem.


    I have pdf copies of a couple of the original manuals that I want to make available to all that would like a copy. Take a look at our sister site https://flight-sim.org in a few days. These are copies of the originals written back in the late 1940s.


    There is not one correct method of flying a Cub. The Cub tends to want to fly when it is ready after you add power and it will climb almost like an elevator, just at a very slow airspeed. Remember, you don’t do anything quickly in a Cub. The slowest landing speed is the best for a smooth 3-point landing.


    Wheel landing are harder in the sim than in the real world. Be prepared for a few bounces until you get the knack of speed, vertical descent, attitude and elevator control.


    If you haven’t spent much time is a taildragger be ready for some S curves when taxiing. Taxi very slowly, no, even slower than that. No faster than a brisk walk. Do notice the airspeed is displayed in Miles per Hour, not Knots.


    This model Cub never had flaps so you will have to learn to slip and crab, but, you can still land on a dime. The really good pilots can land on a dime and leave nine cents change, or so they say.


    Do take some time to stop and smell the roses, as they say. We have nice black leather seats, a gorgeous wooden prop out front, a handheld portable radio just in case we need to fly through some controller airspace or talk to the tower.


    Did I mention that all the switches and valves do work with a nice fluid and smooth motion. Thanks Jan and Krzysztof.


    The hand start of the Cub should appeal to a lot of pilots. Turn on the fuel, turn on the magnetos. Using your mouse, reach out a grab the prop and pull it downward. Nice, huh?


    I think that you will find that our Cub is an absolute delight to fly. I find it mostly intuitive, responsive, predictable and sensitive to my touch. It will always let you know what it wants; such as more or less power or airspeed, more or less rudder or elevator, etc. Yes, and the Cub does like for you to keep your feet on those rudder pedals, smooth but firm.


    You can use any open field as your airport. The beaches of Dry Tortugas, with those tiny sandy islands, golf courses, ball fields, dirt roads, rough strips, even the Swiss glaciers and most of our crazy water surface will do. Pretty much any clear area, wet or dry, is all that is needed for a Cub. Just point it into the wind and ease it down.


    I am busy with a lot of other things that are breaking new ground in AFS2 so I am going to add some pictures, give you a link for downloading and come back later and address any difficulties you might be having. Your biggest decision is going to be which paint scheme will be your default.


    The Cub is most comfortable cruising at a reduced power setting. Maybe 60% or so, it doesn’t like to be pushed, it favors enjoyment instead. It actually prefers grass runways to concrete and short runways to long ones.


    With the scenery getting better all the time I personally enjoy the low and slow flying in the Cub. If you are driving down toward Key West and you see a yellow Cub doing turns around a point or making S-turns across a fence or dirt road, it is probably me out having some fun.


    Keep the windows open and enjoy the view.


    Go to https://github.com/krzysk1 , click on Repositories at the top of the page, airplanes will be listed in order of most recently worked on, find the Pipercub and click on the blue title, then Click on the green Clone or download button, then select the blue download Zip text. You must rename the folder name after you unzip it to remove the –master and you must copy the renamed folder and all files to your personal FS2 aircraft folder. DO NOT put this in the IPACS protected area.


    Ray Marshall, Jetjockey10 8o

    recommended reading for those that are interested in the Cub - http://home.iwichita.com/rh1/hold/av/avhist/a8/a8_cub.htm


    This was a series in the UK. Now I can relive this trip. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6sqVuZN7B0k













    When Pigs Fly. A steely-eyed Sierra Hotel record setting F-15E Strike Eagle simulator pilot. 8o

    ready for some voices in the sky? now available . . . Aerofly FS2 RC ATC https://afs2rcatc.com/


    Edited once, last by Jetjockey10 ().

  • The fuel gauge works and you can even kill the engine in low g maneuvers and fly the fuel tanks empty. I'm not sure if it is realistic but you can also pump the primer to get a bit more fuel into the engine in these situations :D

    Once that prop is stopped there is no way to restart the engine in the air.... once you are on the ground you can grab the prop with the mouse or vr hands to get it spinning again though :)

  • Ray,


    thanks again for the story and thanks to all people involved into this project.


    Regarding publication I suggest to publish your story with all additional information at flight-sim.org.

    You can also include a link to the model at krzysk's site. This makes it easy for all people to find the model and it will not dissapear in the forum.

  • The fuel gauge works and you can even kill the engine in low g maneuvers and fly the fuel tanks empty. I'm not sure if it is realistic but you can also pump the primer to get a bit more fuel into the engine in these situations :D

    Once that prop is stopped there is no way to restart the engine in the air.... once you are on the ground you can grab the prop with the mouse or vr hands to get it spinning again though :)

    Interesting options!


    Any screenshots of the cockpit? Thanks for the screenshot Jetjockey10 !

  • The fuel gauge works and you can even kill the engine in low g maneuvers and fly the fuel tanks empty. I'm not sure if it is realistic but you can also pump the primer to get a bit more fuel into the engine in these situations :D

    Once that prop is stopped there is no way to restart the engine in the air.... once you are on the ground you can grab the prop with the mouse or vr hands to get it spinning again though :)

    Wow, is this a first Jan (fuel running out and cutting the engine - I'm not buying the hand start story!) or have I missed something from the other aircraft updates?


    If fuel level is now known can main.cfg be edited to set the amount in there? If so, this would be a great add-on to perestain 's Pilot Journey

  • Wow, is this a first Jan (fuel running out and cutting the engine - I'm not buying the hand start story!) or have I missed something from the other aircraft updates?


    If fuel level is now known can main.cfg be edited to set the amount in there? If so, this would be a great add-on to perestain 's Pilot Journey

    First aircraft that actually runs out of fuel and stops the engine, yes. The fuel system is not finalized yet, otherwise we would already see this in our default aircraft. But as long as I can "delete" fuel by overfilling a tank we don't want the engines quitting on the user end. Not yet anyways.


    Fuel level ("FillLevel") is programmed in the tmd file of the piper cub.

  • This was a great little series in the UK. Now I can relive his trip.


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6sqVuZN7B0k

    It is ...I like his films "flying across GB" ...

  • First aircraft that actually runs out of fuel and stops the engine, yes. The fuel system is not finalized yet, otherwise we would already see this in our default aircraft. But as long as I can "delete" fuel by overfilling a tank we don't want the engines quitting on the user end. Not yet anyways.


    Fuel level ("FillLevel") is programmed in the tmd file of the piper cub.

    This is great and worth a bit of fanfare! We should be breaking out the champagne. I trust JF will have this stuff in their aircraft and that will be a big purchase justification.


    I thought you've been a bit quieter recently - I think Krzysk has been keeping you busy. Probably helping those JF chaps out too. I bet you're having fun!


    tmd's are static files aren't they? Whenever you switch planes does memory clear and you go back to the fuel level in the tmd?

  • Fuel is reset to the level programmed in the tmd file as soon as you switch liveries or switch aircraft.


    I've actually tested the engine fuel cut in a Just Flight aircraft before I added it to the Piper Cub. So I think it will probably be included there as well but I'm not 100% sure of course, it's their aircraft in the end and things might change. And IPACS is currently helping JustFlight, not sure if Krzysk is also doing that, don't think there is a need for him to do that if IPACS is already doing that.

  • Gave it a try, nice little plane! :)


    And if you are anything like me you probably also made the Cub cold and dark, right? It is WAY TOO MUCH FUN to give that prop a swirl and start the engines manually! You only need to edit two entries in the pipercub.tmd to set the magnetos and fuel to off! It can't get much easier. Unfortunately the engine is turned off 'live'' when you load the plane, which spoils the cold and dark idea a bit, but still, it's nice to have it cold and dark after a second. ;) Just close your ears and eyes for a sec when you load the plane. ;)


    Fun thing: if you position the plane in the air the prop will be turning anyway so if you turn on the magneto and fuel you will be good to go! On the ground things remain cold and dark as they should.


    EDIT

    If you want a cold and dark cub too: look for these two entries in the pipercub.tmd (after making a backup copy first, of course) and edit them. I included all the lines from the relevant parts so you will be sure you won't be editing the wrong lines. ;)


    EDIT 2

    The color won't show up in the code. :rolleyes: The two lines to be edited are '<[float64][Value][0.0]>: both should read 0 (zero).


  • The fuel gauge works and you can even kill the engine in low g maneuvers and fly the fuel tanks empty. I'm not sure if it is realistic but you can also pump the primer to get a bit more fuel into the engine in these situations :D

    Once that prop is stopped there is no way to restart the engine in the air.... once you are on the ground you can grab the prop with the mouse or vr hands to get it spinning again though :)

    Gave the little bird a try and had good fun! But my engine stuttered during higher g maneuvers (pulling up) and not at low gs (flew some push-overs)... maybe I should go check the engine, thats dangerous like that...

    For the future - maybe you could make engines restartable by airflow at higher speeds? I actually tried that using other planes as well and the windmilling behavior until the propeller stops is very well done but once its stopped there is now way to get it back to turning, except for using the starter (if it has one).

    Is it possible to handprop from the outside view? I only got it working from inside the cockpit with mouse but not with VR hands.

  • The fuel has to travel forward as well, so if you pull high g's it might not reach forward enough...

    Regarding the restart: If you don't open the engine valves your prop would have to work against the cylinder compression. That is why on engines that are designed to be started in air by the airflow (e.g. retractable engines in gliders) you have to pull the decompression first. Otherwise you will not get the prop to spin or only at very high speeds.


    In the Cub I deliberately disabled the clickspots for the hand start in the air, so there is no chance to cheat anymore. I think it makes it a bit more thrilling to do aerobatics if you know you can totally kill the engine mid flight and have to land it as a glider.

    On the ground when the aircraft is stopped you should be able to spin the prop from the external pan around view if you get close enough, both with mouse and VR hands (untested but should work)

  • Thanks for your reply Jan.

    You are modelling a different behavior than I thought then. What you explained could happen if the (engine-driven) fuel pump was to weak, that's why I said I would go see a mechanic :D. Fuel priming also wouldn't help in that case, an additional electric fuel pump would help though, but the Cub hasn't got one. The common reason why airplane engines stop at low gs is because the carburetor isn't working then. Happens all the time when flying aerobatics in a Robin 2160...

    Regarding restart, you are absolutely right, you need quite a bit of airspeed to overcome cylinder compression. In the RF 5 (2.0l Limbach engine) it is about 200-220 km/h, as you can see here. It is a handbook method in a TMG like the Fournier.



    In SEP-aircraft you are usually not allowed to kill the engine on purpose (at least in Germany as far as I know) but in the Robin 2160 (Lycoming O-320) the propeller will come to a complete stop in a few turns of a spin. It restarts at around 250-270 km/h, or using the starter of course.

    Again, thank you very much for continuously improving aircraft physics in the sim!