Reality, real-world procedures and George the co-pilot

  • Flight simulators are, by definition, all about the replication of conditions, requirements and procedures of real-world flight. Of course the focus in Light Aircraft GA & Military is more on performing Stick & Rudder VFR oriented manoeuvres & procedures while the Heavy Aircraft simulation realism is based more in the detailed replication of NAV, Autopilot & other IFR related systems.


    One feature of FS2 that has always interested me is George the co-pilot. Observing his airmanship skills or quite often his complete lack & disregard is both interesting and at times amusingly curious.


    FS2 has a huge advantage here. With refinement, after sending George back to flight school - and a reduction in salary - George the co-pilot could demonstrate real-world procedures as skilfully & accurately as possible, at least in some scenarios but hopefully available at all times to demonstrate gold standard airmanship. Of course, a skill adjustment slider could work well too, demonstrating exactly what not to do :? Maybe not I guess.


    The point is the FS2 is more versatile than ever now, as physically & visually accurate as always but now also procedure realism adds another dimension. How can it get better?

  • I'm wondering, what does the video have to do with the thread? It only distracts from the actual question and it doesn't even refer to Aerofly.

    Fair enough. I guess I was trying to show a professionals view of how real simulated systems are. Wrong sim I guess but that would be very interesting to see - real pilots examining the best of realism in Aerofly.

  • With refinement, after sending George back to flight school - and a reduction in salary - George the co-pilot could demonstrate real-world procedures as skilfully & accurately as possible, at least in some scenarios but hopefully available at all times to demonstrate gold standard airmanship.

    That's a very interesting idea. However, given that no commercial aircraft manufacturer has managed that yet - if they had they would be offering single-pilot cockpits - it's perhaps more a subject for doctoral research than a realistic feature request for IPACS. FS2 would be an excellent platform to demonstrate such an AI copilot, in the same way that DARPA recently demonstrated a (fairly basic) AI fighter pilot.

  • Perhaps we could ask a little bit less than true aviator competence from George? If he would do what the captain wanted he would have fewer altitude and speed violations in controlled airspace and he would be safer in terrain more mountainous than Southern Florida

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    Perhaps George has a new higher qualification pending?

  • That's a very interesting idea. However, given that no commercial aircraft manufacturer has managed that yet - if they had they would be offering single-pilot cockpits - it's perhaps more a subject for doctoral research than a realistic feature request for IPACS. FS2 would be an excellent platform to demonstrate such an AI copilot, in the same way that DARPA recently demonstrated a (fairly basic) AI fighter pilot.

    There's now the Safe Return feature option on the Garmin G3000 which performs Emergency Autoland in the Cirrus Vision G2 & other aircraft types. That level of capability allows the possibility for single pilot operation.


    I've flown with Xavion on an iPad around my local airports. Conducting simulated emergency landings, it certainly adds to situational awareness and confidence which I think would be magnified in a real emergency.


    As you say, FS2 would be an excellent platform to demonstrate & reinforce emergency as well as normal flight procedures. It's not a stretch to imagine that possibility in the future.


    This is Safe Return in the Vision G2.


  • Perhaps we could ask a little bit less than true aviator competence from George? If he would do what the captain wanted he would have fewer altitude and speed violations in controlled airspace and he would be safer in terrain more mountainous than Southern Florida

    .

    Perhaps George has a new higher qualification pending?

    Maybe so :) It crossed my mind that Co-pilot Reckless George Shirtpants has already been reprimanded and cut back on the hard spirits before flight. He seems to be a little less reckless although I can't be sure.

  • There's now the Safe Return feature option on the Garmin G3000 which performs Emergency Autoland in the Cirrus Vision G2 & other aircraft types. That level of capability allows the possibility for single pilot operation.

    Safe return is brilliant, although AFAIK it is not traffic-aware and cannot respond to ATC instructions.

  • Safe return is brilliant, although AFAIK it is not traffic-aware and cannot respond to ATC instructions.

    I think Garmin G3000 & Safe Return in Cirrus Vision G2 is the first to be traffic aware via ADS-B and alerts ATC though yes it seems it will select the safest flightpath and not respond to ATC vectors although given the documented capabilities, that would seem to be achievable without too much difficulty.


    Quote

    When someone hits the button, the system selects the airport that has the best combination of runway length and a clear approach relative to the weather conditions. It then steers the airplane on a descent, alerting local traffic and air traffic control to the emergency via preprogrammed text and spoken-word messages it can voice itself over the radio. It deploys the landing gear, adjusts the flaps to maintain lift as the airspeed slows, and uses precision GPS, along with radar information, to bring it down at the exact right spot. Though the system can shut down the engine if necessary—important for aircraft with spinning propellers—Cirrus elected to keep its single engine running after the stop, since it is mounted on top of the aircraft and thus won’t hurt anyone approaching or exiting the plane. This keeps the climate control active inside and allows for taxiing if the pilot or passengers are able to do so.

    https://www.wired.com/story/ci…jet-autoland-safe-return/