Updates for android

  • Short version: press it if you want the aircraft to slow down to approach speed.


    The approach phase reduces the automatically selected airspeed (magenta airspeed, officially called managed airspeed) to the approach speed. It also arms the go around mode for when you move the thrust levers to maximum takeoff goaround (TOGA), deletes the cruise altitude and a few other things.


    The approach phase activates automatically if you are flying along the route in NAV mode and the point at which that will happen is indicated by a magenta "D" with a circle around it at the so called deceleration point. When you are flying in heading mode though this doesn't happen automatically and you have to press that button to manually activate the approach phase. The deceleration point is then white in the navigation display and no longer magenta.

    And if you're flying around with no route or decided to land somewhere else this button helps you to reduce the airspeed without the need to manually select an airspeed.

  • A question .. I use the airbus a320 a lot in aerofly2020 ... But unfortunately when I fly in mountainous areas such as snow or Colorado .. My flight is very complicated not knowing how high to fly the terrain ... What advice do you give me ? It is that without the help of the MCDU where I can see the points and the height level that I must have very difficult .. Hopefully soon we can use the MCDU .. What advice would you give me to know what heights to fly on the approach? For example, when I reach cruising altitude flight level 370 ... I begin the descent ... I am in a mountainous area ... How can I guess how high to descend?

  • Normally this information is displayed on a MAP or the Terrain radar on the ND (you have a button to activate it but not sure it is implemented on the AFS2 A320 though)

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  • In F-PLN the line before the last is corresponding to the last imposed waypoint at 10 Nm facing the runway. In the MCDU the altitude of this point is always 2000 ft AGL (in Aerofly FS2020) — note that the last line is the threshold of the runway at 50 ft AGL.

    I usually approach at 3000 ft AGL (so the 2000 ft AGL+ 1000 ft). 3000 ft AGL is almost set at the pink (D) in the ND, where the plane starts itself the approach phase and deceleration.

    In French: http://a320afs2ios.wpweb.fr/

    Approaching an ILS, you can set a waypoint facing the runway over the 10 Nm. So in the MCDU you can read the altitude at F-PLN > the waypoint. You can descend at this altitude + 1000 ft. The plane will finish the descent at this point and you capture the LOC (this starts the approach phase).

  • In F-PLN the line before the last is corresponding to the last imposed waypoint at 10 Nm facing the runway. In the MCDU the altitude of this point is always 2000 ft AGL (in Aerofly FS2020) — note that the last line is the threshold of the runway at 50 ft AGL.

    I usually approach at 3000 ft AGL (so the 2000 ft AGL+ 1000 ft). 3000 ft AGL is almost set at the pink (D) in the ND, where the plane starts itself the approach phase and deceleration.

    In French: http://a320afs2ios.wpweb.fr/

    Approaching an ILS, you can set a waypoint facing the runway over the 10 Nm. So in the MCDU you can read the altitude at F-PLN > the waypoint. You can descend at this altitude + 1000 ft. The plane will finish the descent at this point and you capture the LOC (this starts the approach phase).

    I give you an example .. I talk about the descent after arriving on a cruise .. For example we are at 33 thousand feet and we fly over a mountainous area I don't know exactly at what height to go down ... If I put 10 thousand feet and there is higher ground ? This is why the fmc needs to work to see the correct heights. On the approach he used the navigation charts to see the height bro

  • You won't normally fly approaches "out of the blue" so you will either follow a published approach (STAR) or you will follow the ATC instructions. In AFS2 there's no ATC so you will check the altitudes on the chart to the IAF to intercept the final (loc and glide) if the runway features an ILS.

    The issue is more from TOD to the STAR, if you happen to fly over a mountain range. In that case you should check the altitudes on a map (or use a flight planner) to see the clearances. That's where the terrain map on the ND is useful as it shows an overlay of the relief in the Now, unless you fly over Himalaya, the Alps or any other well known mountain range you have some margin from FL 370 so I won't be too concerned to start the descent until FL200 and then you can check where you are before joining the initial point in the STAR

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  • In AFS2020, I create my own STAR judging the terrain from the satellite view. 😱 YES, but I feel it also like a game. And the forced 10 Nm waypoint facing the runway can be a nightmare. And the MCDU doesn’t give about altitude constraints (appart from the 2000 ft AGL at 10 Nm). Otherwise I would often put a waypoint before 10 Nm with an altitude constraints to have a TOD for this point.

  • Fix the bugs ... There are problems with the APPR of the airbus 320 and the app of the boeing 777 ... It does not work ... Two days ago it worked perfectly ... Now it does not work ... Once you pressed APPR or app .. Intercept the locator and never intercept the Glide Slope GS ... Please check those bugs .. It is annoying that they do not work properly

  • On the screenshot you're above the glide slope, it is only going to capture it if you intercept it, just like in real life.

    On the navigation display in the lower right you can see the vertical deviation from the flight plan. You are 1700ft above the route, that's why the glide slope was not intercepted.

    Did you use vnav for the descent?

    I use Vnav throughout the flight .. Only on the approach did he manually use the speed of the plane .. That's wrong .. Is it wrong to do it that way? Note that when V / S is activated on the display .. It doesn't activate Glide Slope .. Right? Maybe I'm doing something wrong ... Excuse me


  • All I see from the screenshot is that the autopilot is maintaining altitude (left arrow pointing down to ALT) and that you're way too high (right arrow pointing down to the vertical deviation). The radar altitude isn't even active yet so you're still 2500ft or higher above ground. So at some point the autopilot captured the selected altitude of 3000ft and at that time either the localizer was not active yet so the glide slope couldn't be activated or the aircraft did capture the localizer but was above the glide slope at all time so that the glide slope was never intercepted, in which case you were just too high. That's all correct so far, real world behavior according to the operating manuals.


    Try to select a lower altitude next time, usually 2000ft above the runway works pretty great. 3000ft only works if you monitor the vertical deviation closely to make sure that you end up exactly on the glide slope. If you reduce the speed the aircraft will pitch up and stay high. If you don't select a low enough altitude the autopilot will level off and you'll end up high as well. Make sure that that doesn't happen by monitoring the vertical mode that I drew a red arrow to.... If you see that you've above the glide slope it's easiest to catch up with it in vertical speed mode. When the radar altitude isn't visible yet (>2500ft above ground) then you should be good to select -2000ft/min or even more if needed. Once you get below 2000ft you should consider reducing the descent rate and at 1500ft you should have caught up to it and at least see it moving... Otherwise you're probably not going to make it. Either go around or when you know there is no terrain... a 360° turn also works wonders to get rid of excess energy.


    It may take some practice to see when you are good to drop the speed. It's ok to keep roughly 180 kts before even intercepting the glide slope and 210+ kts before intercepting the localizer. Usually you still have enough time in the last 2000ft above the ground to reduce the speed with gear down and flaps engines at approach idle. (Reduces noise for the virtual citizens on the ground). The only checkpoint you have to meet is 1000ft above ground - fully configured, on speed, on glide.

  • Thank you very much for the advice ... It helped me a lot ... I put the approach height at 2400 feet ... And that immediately activated the glide slope ... At 3 thousand feet sometimes it took to intercept the GS ... A lower height is faster .. The speed then must be 180 to intercept the Glide Slope? And 210 for the locator? Thank you very much .. Sometimes I use manual speed .. And I got to the glode Slope over 150 knots .. Maybe that influenced not to intercept the GS well ... Does the 777 have the manage mode? As the airbus a320 that pressing the speed button manage mode goes down the speeds automatically ... Note that in the 777 the Vnav does not drop automatically .... So I use it manually .. But thank you very much now which must be 210 knots to intercept the LOC and approximately 180 for the GS ... Although I have seen videos of the real landings of the 777 ... sometimes they do not use the LOC button ... They only use the App? Is it valid to do that? And on the airbus a320 they also don't use the LOC button. They directly press the APPR button ... Sometimes I get confused what procedures to follow ... A question ... On the display of the 777 and 320 where I see the glide slope appears physically on the display .. In the form of some color or arrow? If so, could you send me an image with a description arrow .. To be able to see it and thus activate the app perfectly ... Or the slope is activated only by pressing the approach button? Thank you

  • Good morning dear developers .. Sometimes we only use the forum to give our suggestions or present any doubts .. Very few times to thank them for the extraordinary effort and work they do .. I want to congratulate them .. They are an incredible team ... Baron 58 de aerofly 2020 is fantastic ... I love the level of detail of the cockpit .. I love the quality of the physics of the plane ... The wings .. Flaps .. Rudder .. The fully functional cockpit ... Congratulations This plane seems to me one of your best planes on the platform of aerofly2020 .. Keep on this road .. They are going in the right direction .. I am very satisfied with your work ... Aerofly 2020 is the best mobile simulator in the world .. . Thank you

  • One question .. I discovered that when I lower the blue levers .. The propeller blades change shape ... What is that function for? Is it for a safer landing? Find out what makes the revolutions per minute go down ... They might respond please

  • The blue lever changes the target rotation speed of the propeller. The Baron has a constant speed propeller, which means the engine and propeller rotate at a constant speed regardless of how fast you fly and how much power you apply. When you add more power the blade pitch is automatically increased to grab more air and thus increases the torque on the driveshaft but the rotation speed stays constant.


    You can probably find millions of search results online for "constant speed propeller"