Side by side comparison Aerofly FS2 vs real life

  • Thx again for yet another great video!


    It actually also shows a particular aspects where AEFS2's way of portraying reality, and one which is important for the realism / accuracy of the simulation, really needs tuning - the PAPI light systems.


    Their positioning, size and efficiency, as well as ( afaik ) there being just one type of PAPI and no APAPI, VASI or T-VASI although these are seldom used these days, are additional features I would like to see updated for upcoming releases.

    1983 ......……....2012.…………….......2018...

    fs1 ===>     MS FLIGHT ===>   WT 1.83

    Start ... Hope ... Realization ...

    Edited once, last by jcomm ().

  • Thx again for yet another great video!


    It actually also shows a particular aspects where AEFS2's way of portraying reality, and one which is important for the realism / accuracy of the simulation, really needs tuning - the PAPI light systems.


    Their positioning, size and efficiency, as well as ( afaik ) there being just one type of PAPI and no APAPI, VASI or T-VASI although these are seldom used these days, are additional features I would like to see updated for upcoming releases.

    jcomm the PAPI on Runway 03 at Samedan is not aligned with the touchdown point for small aircraft. Overloaded You need to pass an online Test every 12 months and you need at least one landing every 24 months. Otherwise you have to land with an instructor that's current. Here is the link to the briefing


    Thanks for all the great feedback!

    Im working on a side by side video overflying the jungfrau joch. I will post it in the next few days.

  • I just uploaded a comparison video of a Flight over the Swiss Alps, see the first post of this thread.

    Awesome comparison! Aerofly FS 2 is so close to the real thing. And we can see there is one pity: the snow is not white enough. :) Maybe IPACS can improve on the snow color in the future update because of your video.

  • lol ppl who say iuts close to the real thing, thats only the visual aspect.

    the simming aspect is far from real, no proper weather.

    and beacuse of that the serious flightsimmer wont come in good numbers.

    i dont see thsi change very soon. i cna only hope it keepos developing and maybe in 2/3 years it migth be called a proper fligtsimulator.

  • lol ppl who say iuts close to the real thing, thats only the visual aspect.

    the simming aspect is far from real, no proper weather.

    and beacuse of that the serious flightsimmer wont come in good numbers.

    i dont see thsi change very soon. i cna only hope it keepos developing and maybe in 2/3 years it migth be called a proper fligtsimulator.

    I agree. This is an important missing feature that hopefully will be implemented soon by IPACS or by any third party. IPACS keep saying they’re a small team, so if they’re the only choice I fear the timeframe would be similar to the one you mentioned.

    Cheers, Ed

  • Sir,


    All I can say is "WOW!" Fantastic work! I am a pilot myself and I thoroughly enjoy flight simming. They are great tools for fun and learning. I wish to offer you some humble thoughts on the way that you confidently handle your REAL aircraft if I may.


    Airmanship is something one sees little of nowadays being taught to new pilots. In your video you remove your right hand from the throttle during the final phase of your ground flare. Typically, a captain RETAINS his hand on the throttle during this phase, and through out the approach, flare, landing, and roll out.


    This is in order to "jockey" the throttle in response to possible abrupt wind changes or gusts or to execute a GO AROUND if required for some unforeseen reason. More importantly, keeping your hand on the throttle keeps your BRAIN in a mode of rejecting the landing if needed. Once, while I was landing a Challenger 601 at a remote airstrip in Africa, I rejected the landing because of an antelope suddenly crossing the runway.


    It is like the V1 call out in jets where the pilot flying (PF) keeps his hand on the throttle until he hears it, and only THEN does he remove his hand from the throttle. Once the hand is REMOVED from the throttle then the PF is COMMITTED in mind and body to making the take off! If an emergency occurs AFTER this call out then the aircraft is taken into the air and the emergency is handled there.


    "V1 is defined as the speed beyond which the take-off should no longer be aborted. Meaning that in case you experience any trouble with your plane before reaching V1 you would immediately abort your take-off and would apply all the necessary means to bring the aircraft to a halt. If pilots experience any serious aircraft malfunction after V1, otherwise they have to continue the take-off, a take-off board will lead to a runway overrun and could severely damage the plane."


    ( https://www.baatraining.com/di…-off-speeds-v1-vr-and-v2/ )


    This frame of reference and commitment is the same in regards to landing. One should think of EVERY landing as going missed and then one suffers NO surprises, ie, every instrument approach is to a MISSED approach. Besides, it is easier to hit the thrust reversers with your hand on the throttle than on the yoke. I suggest that you ask around regards this technique of airmanship and let me know what you find out. Oh, and ask both the general aviation pilot and the occasional professional pilot when you can. Pilots LOVE to talk to other pilots. (I joined this forum simply to say these few words, or to talk to another pilot).


    I thank you for your videos (made my day) and I wish you only the best, Captain.


    Respectfully

  • JazzyJazz That's an interesting observation. During my training based on the guidelines set out by the SwissPSA (Swiss Pilot School Association ) we were taught to rotate with both hands on the yoke. The reason for this (I asked the instructor sitting next to me landing in Innsbruck) was that the pull is more symmetrical especially on planes that have the yoke connected directly via cables. I see your point regarding the throttle. I will ask my Swiss instructors the next time I see them.

  • So if the throttle friction is loose on a full power climb-out the engine just winds down because there is no hand on the power lever? Saving some asymmetric wear on the control column could cost lives.

    Have you been in a real cockpit? 8o

    I havent seen any aircraft where this would become an issue. Aircraft with lose throttle levers should be send into maintenance...

    Its not so much about the wear, it is done to have a straight takeoff. If you pull on one side you accidentally deflect the wheel to one side.

  • Have you been in a real cockpit? 8o

    I havent seen any aircraft where this would become an issue. Aircraft with lose throttle levers should be send into maintenance...

    Its not so much about the wear, it is done to have a straight takeoff. If you pull on one side you accidentally deflect the wheel to one side.

    In some of the Robins DR-400, this is actually the case. You have to check the position of the throttle every few minutes...:)

  • I've been in plenty of real aeroplane cockpits AND glider cockpits :evil:. I was taught to ONLY have one hand on the control column and not one instructor or examiner had the slightest worry about biasing the plane to spiral half out of control. The sportier planes had a stick and holding a control column in a finger and thumb is directly equivalent, the pilot gives whatever input is required to make the plane do exactly what he or she wants.

    Engines vibrate and throttle creep is a dangerous phenomenon warned about early in elementary training. Throttle friction is not to be trusted and a hand is required on the throttle at all critical times. In multi crew operations the operating pilot takes his throttle hand away at V1 as described earlier but the non flying pilot has his hand on the throttles immediately. In this case the pilot can use both hands if desired especially with heavy or miss-trimmed controls.

    Try flying the Robinson R22 with both hands on the stick! Yes, I have flown a real helicopter 8o.

  • I've been in plenty of real aeroplane cockpits AND glider cockpits :evil:. I was taught to ONLY have one hand on the control column and not one instructor or examiner had the slightest worry about biasing the plane to spiral half out of control. The sportier planes had a stick and holding a control column in a finger and thumb is directly equivalent, the pilot gives whatever input is required to make the plane do exactly what he or she wants.

    Engines vibrate and throttle creep is a dangerous phenomenon warned about early in elementary training. Throttle friction is not to be trusted and a hand is required on the throttle at all critical times. In multi crew operations the operating pilot takes his throttle hand away at V1 as described earlier but the non flying pilot has his hand on the throttles immediately. In this case the pilot can use both hands if desired especially with heavy or miss-trimmed controls.

    Try flying the Robinson R22 with both hands on the stick! Yes, I have flown a real helicopter 8o.

    This is how I was taught from my first flight lesson 20 years ago and it is how I have flown every single takeoff and landing ever since. Left hand on yoke, right hand on throttle. When I fly the Super Decathlon, my right hand is on the stick and my left is on the throttle during takeoff and landing.


    If I even thought about removing my hand from the throttle before reaching pattern altitude, I'd get a whipping LOL:D

    Redtail

    KFRG, KTEB, KEWR, KLGA

    ~Straighten up and fly right~


    DESKTOP: i7-7700k @5GHz (water cooled), Nvidia GTX 1080Ti FTW3, 32GB DDR4, 500GB SSD, Oculus Rift CV1, Windows 10 Home 64 bit,

    TM HOTAS Warthog (large spring removed), Saitek PRO Flight Combat Rudder Pedals, YOKO yoke!

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    Edited once, last by Redtail ().

  • So if the throttle friction is loose on a full power climb-out the engine just winds down because there is no hand on the power lever? Saving some asymmetric wear on the control column could cost lives.

    To clarify only during rotating and flaring. Apart from that the hand is always on the throttle.


    Regarding the asymmetric thing:

    Its not about wearing out the yoke. But the fact that the yoke might get stuck or not move smoothly if you pull it on one side only. There is some logic to that in my opinion, since in small airplanes the yoke and metal stick is all mechanic. During rotation and flaring the pull is relatively pronounced and there is a long movement forward or backwards. I was told this could occur on older more worn out planes.

  • I actually have an audio program of an aviation seminar by Rod Machado, where he advocates using both hands on the yoke during the landing in really gusty conditions, if you feel the need to do so. So a few years ago when I heard that, I went up and tried it, but I just couldn't get my brain to accept something against what had become muscle-memory for so many years. It just didn't work out for me, so I continued to round-out, touchdown and roll out as I had been taught.


    I understand his reasoning, which was specifically for extreme gusty conditions. He never mentioned anything about the yoke sticking, asymmetric pulling or anything like that. I've never had an instructor voice that as a concern.


    In fact, even during cruise (when not using autopilot) I usually fly with one hand on the stick/yoke. It gives me more precise control.

    None of the Cessnas I trained in or took my checkride in had an autopilot.

    Redtail

    KFRG, KTEB, KEWR, KLGA

    ~Straighten up and fly right~


    DESKTOP: i7-7700k @5GHz (water cooled), Nvidia GTX 1080Ti FTW3, 32GB DDR4, 500GB SSD, Oculus Rift CV1, Windows 10 Home 64 bit,

    TM HOTAS Warthog (large spring removed), Saitek PRO Flight Combat Rudder Pedals, YOKO yoke!

    Laptop (gaming): Acer Predator Helios 500- Intel Core i7-8750H @4.1GHz, Nvidia GTX 1070, 32GB DDR4, 256GB SSD/1TB HDD.

    Gametrix JetSeat FSE (Flight Sim Edition)-USB Vibrating pad. Nextlevel V3 Motion Platform / Sim cockpit.

    Edited 2 times, last by Redtail ().

  • I got my slap on the wrist for using the instructor's throttle in a Socata Rallye! The left seat occupant is supposed to use a left side throttle plunger and hold a stick in the right hand. I liked the auto leading edge slats in the Rallye but this felt very odd as did the castoring nose wheel. The Aerofly FS/FS1 Robin is similar (peculiar how it is not available in (android) Aerofly 1).

    Funny how a Monsieur Blériot discovered the basic aeroplane layout!